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:oops::-[] 3 Celts & Company • "BUCHANAN"

Clan Siol Ui'Cain: the race of O Kyan ( the Cathan/Chattan ).

Maormorship of Moray:: clans Chattan, Cameron, Nachtan/MacNachton/Nacton, Gillean/MacLean/MacLaine, Siol O'Cain:: Munro/Clann an Rothaich/Roich & Gillemheol/MacMillan.

Legend derives the clan's original name MacAusian from Irish prince Anselan O Kyan, granted a settlement in Lennox by Malcolm II. The Auselan first actually recorded was Steward to a 13th-century Earl of Lennox, from whom he obtained the Loch-Lomondside district of Buchanan, which includes Ben Lomond. His son Gilbert was the first user of the Buchanan surname, as well as founder of the branches that took his own name. From Gilbert's brothers Colman and Methlan, grandson Maurice and great-granson Walter there derive other sept names, and the separated clan MacMillan.
George Buchanan, a fore-runner (though in Latin) of Burns and Byron, the tutor of Montaigne, Mary Queen of Scots and James VI, historian and Reformationist, ranks as the clan's chief personality, though a U.S. President could be among others cited.

Septs: COLMAN, CORMACK, COUSLAND, DEWAR, DOVE, DOW, GIBB, GIBBON, GIBSON, GILBERT, GILBERTSON, HARPER, HARPERSON, LEAVY, LENNIE, LENNY, MACALDONICH, MACALMAN, MACASLAN, MANASLIN, MACAUSELAN, MACAUSLAN, MACAUSLAND, MACAUSLANE, MACALMAN, MACCALMONT, MACCAMMOND, MACCASLAND, MACCHRUITER, MACCOLMAN, MACCORMACK, MACCUBBIN, MACCUBING, MACCUBIN, MACGEORGE, MACGIBBON, MACGRREWSICH, MACGUBBIN, MACINALLY, MACINDEOR, MACINDOE, MACKINLAY, MACKINLEY, MACMASTER, MACMAURICE, MACMURCHIE, MACMURCHY, MACNEUR, MACNUIR, MACNUYER, MACQUATTIE, MACWATTIE, MACWHIRTER, MASTERS, MASTERSON, MORRICE, MORRIS, MORRISON, MURCHIE, MURCHISON, RICHARDSON, RISK, RUSK, RUSKIN, SPITTAL, SPITTEL, WALTER, WALTERS, WASON, WATERS, WATSON, WATT, WATTERS, WEIR, YUILL, YOOL, YULE, ZUILL

"MACMILLAN" The term 'ancient' normally describes a change in colour that can be applied to any tartan. In the case of MacMillan the 'ancient' form involves a more radical change, justifying the traditional use of the adjective in the name of the tartan. James Logan, co-author of 'The Clans of the Scottish Highlands' (1847), states that this version is identical with Buchanan. The thread count was deduced by J. Cant from the illustration by R.R. MacIan in the same work.

"BUKANSIDA" an Old Norse place name. "-an" Scot masculine suffix used to form nouns often for male given names. The Earldom of Mar and Buchan formed one of the seven original Scottish earldoms (Kingdom of Ce). Alba's stone circles are most densely concentrated near Aberdeen, in old Buchan.

"Odin's Stone" Promise of Odin, a promise of marriage or particular sort of contract, accounted very sacred by some of the inhabitants of Orkney. [...] the Stone at Stenhouse with the round hole in it, [...] was customary, when promises were made, for the contracting parties to join hands through this hole; and the promises so made were called the promises of Odin.

"PROMISE of ODIN." An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language: Volume 2. Edinburgh, SCOT: University Press, c.1808. chap.O. Print.

"BUKANSIDA". Grímur Jónsson Thorkelin. Fragments of English and Irish history in the ninth and tenth century. London, UK. 2 Nov 1788. map. Print.

"BUCHANAN." Scots Kith and Kin and Illustrated Map Revised Second Edition. Edinburgh, SCOT: Clan House, c.1970. p.50. Print.

"Ancient North Scotland." The Highland Monthly - Volume 2. Edinburgh: JOHN MENZIES & CO. c.1890-91. p.546. Print.

"MACMILLAN ANCIENT" National Records of Scotland, H.M. General Register House, 2 Princes Street, Edinburgh, EH1 3YY. [https://www.tartanregister.gov.uk/tartanDetails?ref=2657]. 2019. web.

keywords[x] tartan, wool, kilts, Buchanan, clan, septs
# 7 - Clan Buchanan, see also MacMillan - - - - - Scotland
:-[] 3 Celts & Company • "CUMMING"

The Cummings or Cumyns trace Norman descent from Charlemange through Robert de Comyn, appointed governor of Northumberland in 1068 by his kinsman William the Conqueror. Under David I, William de Comyn became Chancellor of Scotland in 1133. Settled first in Roxburghshire, the family later gained through marriages the earldom of Buchan and Balenoch; and Altyre in Moray has long been the seat of their chief. :-P From 1309 the Comyn's power was broken through their having contested Bruce's succession to the throne. Sir John ('the Red') Comyn's mother was the sister of ex-king John Baliol. He was slain by Bruce's party at Dumfries [Grey Friars], and the Buchan Comyns were defeated in battle at Inverurie, 1308.

Septs: BUCHAN, CHEYNE, CHIENE, COMMON, COMMONS, CUMMIN, CUMMINGS, CUMYN, FARQUHARSON, MACNIVEN, NIVEN, RUSSELL

"CUMMING." Scots Kith and Kin and Illustrated Map Revised Second Edition. Edinburgh, SCOT: Clan House, c.1970. p.53. Print.

keywords[x] tartan, wool, kilts, Cumming, clan, septs
# 6 - Cumming, see Black Watch - - - - - Scotland
:-[]:-P 3 Celts & Company • "MACDUFF"

Like the clan's claim of descent from Clan Alpin, the real story of Shakespeare's Macduff overthrowing Macbeth in 1056 remains uncertain, but the hereditary special privilages and dispensations once known as 'Law Clan Macduff' must have originated from some other notable service. Thus, it was accepted even by Edward I, "Hammer of the Scots," that a Scottish king could be properly crowned only by a Macduff. Edward retained that young chief at the English court and gave him his grand-daughter's hand, but Macduff's sister Isabel countess of Buchan crowned King Robert Bruce in 1306. Captured later by Edward, she was punished by confinement in a cage at Berwick.
Until among the first Earls created by David I, the Macduff Thanes of Fife held their territory in the old Celtic manner 'by grace of God,' not from King--hence occasional mentions of the county as though of itself a 'kingdom.' Their direct line failed with another 14th-century Isabel, but the Duff families then first heard of in Aberdeenshire claim to carry on the clan. They reacquired the title Earl, then Duke of Fife, but their territory remained around where they founded the fishing town Macduff.

"Law of Clan MacDuff." In 1425, the last Earl of Fife, Murdoch Stewart, Duke of Albany, was beheaded. The Clan MacDuff's hereditary right of bearing the Crown of Scotland then passed to the Lord Abernethy. The current Lord Abernethy, who is consequently bearer of the Scottish Crown, is Alexander Douglas-Hamilton, 16th Duke of Hamilton, Hereditary Keeper of the Palace of Holyroodhouse.

Septs: DUFF, FIFE, FYFE, FYFFE, HUME, KILGOUR, SPENCE, SPENS, WEEMS, WEMYSS

"MACDUFF." Scots Kith and Kin and Illustrated Map Revised Second Edition. Edinburgh, SCOT: Clan House, c.1970. p.66,67. Print.

"Law of Clan MacDuff." Wikipedia. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_MacDuff]. 12 September 2017. web.

keywords[x] tartan, wool, kilts, MacDuff, MacIntosh, clan, Chattan, septs
# 5 - Macduff, see MacIntosh and Clan Chattan - - - - - Scotland
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