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:-[]:-P 3 Celts & Company • "CAMPBELL"

Like their name itself, frequently interpreted as Cam-beul, 'wry-mouth,' this forthrightly ambitious clan claims origin both Celtic and Norman, though the accounts vary. One relates how Malcolm of the clan anciently named O Duibhne or MacDiarmid, went as a widower to Norman France, where he married an heiress of the Beauchamp family and adopted that name. A son Archibald accompanied the Conqueror in 1066, and became founder to several English lines, these ringing changes on the name, as Beauchamp to Beecham, Compobello, Kemble. Hugo de Morville, David I's High Constable and assistant feudaliser, married Beatrix de Campobello and introduced Campbells as vassals on his Ayrshire lands.
The family of Colin Campbell went on to become firm supporters of King Robert the Bruce and benefited from his successes with grants of lands, titles and good marriages. They fought for the Bruce against the English at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 during the Wars of Scottish Independence. During the 14th century the Clan Campbell rapidly expanded its lands and power. This is partly explained by the loyalty of Sir Neil Campbell (Niall mac Caile), (d.1315), to the cause of Robert I of Scotland (the Bruce) – a loyalty which was rewarded with marriage to Bruce's sister Mary.
The family was closely associated with the Bruces and Stewarts in the time of Cailean Mór and his son Sir Neil Campbell was a staunch ally of King Robert Bruce. Sir Neil was rewarded with extensive lands that had been taken from the forfeited MacDougall, Lords of Lorne and other enemies of the Bruce in Argyll.
Of their main stem, rising to its dukedom of Argyll, we hear of them in possession at Lochow (Loch Awe) after Alexander II's conquest of Argyll. This need not contradict the other tradition of Lochow as O Duibhne territory from long earlier. It would clinch with the Campbell aptitude for backing the winning authority, and with their later royal commission to surpress the refractory MacDonalds of 1614-17 and oust them from Kintyre. The troublesome MacGregors of Perthshire had just previously been treated to a similar policing. And Highland memories run deep. Among many Campbell branches, that of Breadalbane illustrates their other aptitude for successful marriage, being begun by a 14th-century match with the Glenorchy heiress. For other septs, see Campbell of Cawdor, also MacArthur.
In 1725, six Independent Black Watch companies were formed: three from Clan Campbell, one from Clan Fraser, one from Clan Munro and one from Clan Grant. These companies were known by the name Reicudan Dhu, or Black Watch. Taking advantage of the partisan nature and warrior instincts of the highlanders, these men were authorised to wear the kilt and to bear arms, thus it was not difficult to find recruits. The Regiment of the Line was formed officially in 1739 as the 43rd Highland Regiment of Foot under John Lindsay, 20th Earl of Crawford, and first mustered in 1740, at Aberfeldy.

Septs: BALLANTYNE, BANNATYNE, BURNES, BURNESS, BURNS, CONNACHIE, CONOCHIE, DENOON, DENUNE, DONACHIE, DONAGHY, FISHER, HAWES, HAWS, HAWSON, ISAAC, ISAACS, IVERSON, KELLAR, KELLER, KISSACK, KISSOCK, LORNE, LOUDEN, LOWDON, LOWDEN, LOUDON, MACCOLM, MACCOMBE, MACCONACHIE, MACCONCHIE, MACCONNECHY, MACCURE, MACDERMID, MACDERMONT, MACDIARMID, MACDONACHIE, MACELLAR, MACELVIE, MACEUR, MACEVER, MACGIBBON, MACGLASRICH, MACGUBBIN, MACISAAC, MACIVER, MACIVOR, MACKELLAR, MACKELVIE, MACKERLICH, MACKERLIE, MACKESSACK, MACKESSOCK, MACKISSOCK, MACKIVER, MACLAWS, MACLEHOSE, MACLIVER, MACNICHOL, MACNICOL, MACNIVEN, MACNOCAIRD, MACONACHIE, MACORAN, MACPHEDRAN, MACQUACKER, MACTAVISH, MACTHOMAS, MACURE, MACVICAR, OCHILTREE, ORR, PATERSON, PINKERTON, TAWESON, TAWSE, THOMAS, THOMPSON, THOMSON, URE

"CAMPBELL." Scots Kith and Kin and Illustrated Map Revised Second Edition. Edinburgh, SCOT: Clan House, c.1970. p.51,52. Print.

"Clan Campbell." Wikipedia. [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Campbell]. 24 December 2013. web.

keywords[x] tartan, wool, kilts, Campbell, Black Watch, clan, septs
# 62 - Campbell also Black Watch and MacArthur - 12/28/2013 - 09:30 - - - Scotland
:-[] 3 Celts & Company • "CLAN CHATTAN"

This long-powerful group of clans [arguably cast during the reign of Kenneth MacAlpin] comprised two main divisions, respectively under Macintosh and MacPherson leadership, with some subsidiary septs and family groups joining for protection under a general banner. Dissension arose among the sections from various causes, not least from their encroaching neighbours the Gordons enticing them into opposing camps, as at Harlaw 1411.
Accounts of the Clan Chattan's origin vary. The Macintoshes, holding to their own Macduff origin, regard it as a confederacy, with the MacPhersons just a branch from Macintosh stock. MacPhersons, putting reliance on a written geneology of 1450, favor the Chattan sections as having branched from an ancestor Gillechattan Mor, a Moray chief of the early 11th century: his elder son Nechtan founding the MacPhersons, and the younger Neil the Macintoshes, which surname only appears two centuries later. Either way of it, the Clunie MacPhersons retained the old Chattan chiefship although in 1291 the Macintoshes, through marriage of their chief Angus to Eva the MacPherson heiress, achieved the greater share of land and followers, also their chief's right to be styled 'Captain of the Clan Chattan,' leaving their claim to full chiefship a good-going dispute scarcely yet settled.

MacPherson Group: MACPHERSON, DAVIDSON, GILLESPIE, KEITH, SMITH

Macintosh Group: MACINTOSH, FARQUHARSON, MACBEAN, MACGILLIVRAY, MACGLASHAN, MACHARDIE, MACQUEEN, NOBLE, MACTAVISH, SHAW

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Also: CAMERON, CHATTANACH, CLARK, MACPHAIL

"CLAN CHATTAN." Scots Kith and Kin and Illustrated Map Revised Second Edition. Edinburgh, SCOT: Clan House, c.1970. p.52,53. Print.

keywords[x] tartan, wool, kilts, MacPherson, MacIntosh, clan, septs
# 61 - see MacPherson and Clark | Clergy and MacIntosh - 12/23/2013 - 13:13 - - - Scotland
:-[] 3 Celts & Company • "CUMMING"

The Cummings or Cumyns trace Norman descent from Charlemange through Robert de Comyn, appointed governor of Northumberland in 1068 by his kinsman William the Conqueror. Under David I, William de Comyn became Chancellor of Scotland in 1133. Settled first in Roxburghshire, the family later gained through marriages the earldom of Buchan and Balenoch; and Altyre in Moray has long been the seat of their chief. :-P From 1309 the Comyn's power was broken through their having contested Bruce's succession to the throne. Sir John ('the Red') Comyn's mother was the sister of ex-king John Baliol. He was slain by Bruce's party at Dumfries [Grey Friars], and the Buchan Comyns were defeated in battle at Inverurie, 1308.

Septs: BUCHAN, CHEYNE, CHIENE, COMMON, COMMONS, CUMMIN, CUMMINGS, CUMYN, FARQUHARSON, MACNIVEN, NIVEN, RUSSELL

"CUMMING." Scots Kith and Kin and Illustrated Map Revised Second Edition. Edinburgh, SCOT: Clan House, c.1970. p.53. Print.

keywords[x] tartan, wool, kilts, Cumming, clan, septs
# 60 - Cumming, see Black Watch - 12/23/2013 - 08:27 - - - Scotland

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