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:-[] 3 Celts & Company • "BRODIE"

Early records were destroyed by Lord Gordon, when he burned Brodie Castle, Nairnshire, in 1645; but the de Brothies or Brodies are elsewhere mentioned in influential positions from at least the 14th century. Whether an ancient tribe secured in loyal possession, or related to the incoming Murrays, [see "DOUGLAS" p.54] the Brodie name and lands became established when Malcolm IV transplanted other rebelling Moray tribes to different districts, about 1165.

Septs: BRODY, BRYDE, BRYDIE

"BRODIE." Scots Kith and Kin and Illustrated Map Revised Second Edition. Edinburgh, SCOT: Clan House, c.1970. p.49. Print.

keywords[x] tartan, wool, kilts, Brodie, Douglas, clan, septs
# 67 - Brodie, see Douglas - 12/31/2013 - 07:41 - - - Scotland
:-P 3 Celts & Company • "BRUCE"

With the representatives of Norman families who accompanied William the Conqueror, those of de Brus, Robert and his two sons, were not far behind. In the name of Brusi, another branch directly Norse had already acquired a share of the Orkney earldom.
Robert's second son Adam acquired large territories in Yorkshire, and Adam's son Robert was one of the friends of the Scottish king David I who accompanied him at his accession in 1124, when returning from his sojourn in England. This Robert de Brus was granted the lordship of Annandale with the hand of that district's native heiress ['mater:' Emma de Ramesie of Dalhousie Castle, "RAMSAY" b.1062 at Carrick, Argyllshire]. The seventh of the Brus lords of Annandale, Robert de Brus (1274-1329, and later often called 'The Bruce'), was to become King Robert I, victor of Bannockburn and Liberator of Scotland.
From his mother, the heiress of Carrick, Turnberry Castle became a new nucleus of the Bruces; then from 1359 another branch spread still more extensively from Clackmannan, into Fife and elsewhere. From Kinnaird, on the Forth shore opposite, came James Bruce (1730-94), who displayed gifts more versatile and diplomatic than are suggested by a bare reminder of his Abyssinian adventures and first exploration of the Nile sources.

Septs: CARLYLE, CARRUTHERS, CROSBIE, RANDOLPH, STENHOUSE

"BRUCE." Scots Kith and Kin and Illustrated Map Revised Second Edition. Edinburgh, SCOT: Clan House, c.1970. p.49,50. Print.

Neptune, Jerri. "Emma de Ramsay (c.1062 - 1094)". Geni. [http://www.geni.com/people/Emma-de-Ramsay/6000000000437878216]. 2013. web.

keywords[x] tartan, wool, kilts, Bruce, de Brus, clan, septs
# 66 - The Family Bruce - 12/31/2013 - 07:23 - - - Scotland
:oops::-[] 3 Celts & Company • "BUCHANAN"

Clan Siol Ui'Cain: the race of O Kyan ( the Cathan/Chattan ).

Maormorship of Moray:: clans Chattan, Cameron, Nachtan/MacNachton/Nacton, Gillean/MacLean/MacLaine, Siol O'Cain:: Munro/Clann an Rothaich/Roich & Gillemheol/MacMillan.

Legend derives the clan's original name MacAusian from Irish prince Anselan O Kyan, granted a settlement in Lennox by Malcolm II. The Auselan first actually recorded was Steward to a 13th-century Earl of Lennox, from whom he obtained the Loch-Lomondside district of Buchanan, which includes Ben Lomond. His son Gilbert was the first user of the Buchanan surname, as well as founder of the branches that took his own name. From Gilbert's brothers Colman and Methlan, grandson Maurice and great-granson Walter there derive other sept names, and the separated clan MacMillan.
George Buchanan, a fore-runner (though in Latin) of Burns and Byron, the tutor of Montaigne, Mary Queen of Scots and James VI, historian and Reformationist, ranks as the clan's chief personality, though a U.S. President could be among others cited.

Septs: COLMAN, CORMACK, COUSLAND, DEWAR, DOVE, DOW, GIBB, GIBBON, GIBSON, GILBERT, GILBERTSON, HARPER, HARPERSON, LEAVY, LENNIE, LENNY, MACALDONICH, MACALMAN, MACASLAN, MANASLIN, MACAUSELAN, MACAUSLAN, MACAUSLAND, MACAUSLANE, MACALMAN, MACCALMONT, MACCAMMOND, MACCASLAND, MACCHRUITER, MACCOLMAN, MACCORMACK, MACCUBBIN, MACCUBING, MACCUBIN, MACGEORGE, MACGIBBON, MACGRREWSICH, MACGUBBIN, MACINALLY, MACINDEOR, MACINDOE, MACKINLAY, MACKINLEY, MACMASTER, MACMAURICE, MACMURCHIE, MACMURCHY, MACNEUR, MACNUIR, MACNUYER, MACQUATTIE, MACWATTIE, MACWHIRTER, MASTERS, MASTERSON, MORRICE, MORRIS, MORRISON, MURCHIE, MURCHISON, RICHARDSON, RISK, RUSK, RUSKIN, SPITTAL, SPITTEL, WALTER, WALTERS, WASON, WATERS, WATSON, WATT, WATTERS, WEIR, YUILL, YOOL, YULE, ZUILL

"MACMILLAN" The term 'ancient' normally describes a change in colour that can be applied to any tartan. In the case of MacMillan the 'ancient' form involves a more radical change, justifying the traditional use of the adjective in the name of the tartan. James Logan, co-author of 'The Clans of the Scottish Highlands' (1847), states that this version is identical with Buchanan. The thread count was deduced by J. Cant from the illustration by R.R. MacIan in the same work.

"BUKANSIDA" an Old Norse place name. "-an" Scot masculine suffix used to form nouns often for male given names. The Earldom of Mar and Buchan formed one of the seven original Scottish earldoms (Kingdom of Ce). Alba's stone circles are most densely concentrated near Aberdeen, in old Buchan.

"Odin's Stone" Promise of Odin, a promise of marriage or particular sort of contract, accounted very sacred by some of the inhabitants of Orkney. [...] the Stone at Stenhouse with the round hole in it, [...] was customary, when promises were made, for the contracting parties to join hands through this hole; and the promises so made were called the promises of Odin.

"PROMISE of ODIN." An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language: Volume 2. Edinburgh, SCOT: University Press, c.1808. chap.O. Print.

"BUKANSIDA". Grímur Jónsson Thorkelin. Fragments of English and Irish history in the ninth and tenth century. London, UK. 2 Nov 1788. map. Print.

"BUCHANAN." Scots Kith and Kin and Illustrated Map Revised Second Edition. Edinburgh, SCOT: Clan House, c.1970. p.50. Print.

"Ancient North Scotland." The Highland Monthly - Volume 2. Edinburgh: JOHN MENZIES & CO. c.1890-91. p.546. Print.

"MACMILLAN ANCIENT" National Records of Scotland, H.M. General Register House, 2 Princes Street, Edinburgh, EH1 3YY. [https://www.tartanregister.gov.uk/tartanDetails?ref=2657]. 2019. web.

keywords[x] tartan, wool, kilts, Buchanan, clan, septs
# 65 - Clan Buchanan, see also MacMillan - 12/31/2013 - 05:03 - - - Scotland

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